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Handling Stress

By Brandy
VanDeWalle

First of all, I’d like to give a shout-out to the many volunteers who helped contribute to a successful county fair! Without great volunteers so freely giving their time and talents to the youth in the 4-H program, 4-H would not be the success it is! I would like to personally thank all of the extension staff, fair board members, 4-H Council members, superintendents, and other volunteers for their dedication to the 4-H program. Fair can be a stressful time; however, when we don’t lose sight of its purpose can create long-lasting and positive memories.
Speaking of stress, one of my colleagues recently captured a few stress relieving tips to consider as summer comes to an end and youth will be in school. Megan Burda writes how stress is just a part of life; we can’t live without it, but sometimes we feel that we can’t live with it!
Stress comes from many sources: a family crisis such as death, divorce or long separation; It might be from overloaded schedules; maybe expectations that cannot be met or unexpected circumstances; A loss of job, health, home or friendship; it can even come from a happy event as marriage, the birth of a child, or moving into a new home. Regardless of the cause, the following are three ways you can manage your stress: alter it, avoid it, or accept it.
Alter your life by removing the source of stress. Some stressors can be relieved by better planning or organization in your life. Simple things like having emergency supplies on hand, not shopping at the busiest times of the week, or organizing your work space can each be stress relievers. If morning schedules are tight, lay out children’s clothes or set the table for breakfast the night before.
Avoiding stress is another management strategy. Learn to say no, when an addition to your schedule will only add to your stress. If you are stressed by long waits, plan something to do (like reading a book) while you wait for an appointment. If there is too much tension in your home or office, go for a walk to clear your mind and relieve the tension.
Find a way to accept the stressors that we have no control over. Talking to a trusted friend will help you put things in perspective. Keeping in good health by eating well, getting enough sleep and keeping a routine are essential. Look for the good. Even in the worst of circumstances, there are things that can bring a smile to your face, reasons to be thankful, and opportunities to help others.
Source: How to Manage Daily Stress@ by Dr. Herbert G. Lingren, Extension Family Scientist, NF98-388.
Bacterial Leaf Streak
My other colleague from York County, Jenny Rees provided a quick summary of bacterial leaf streak (BLS) which has been confirmed in corn in various parts of the state. Lesions can look similar to other diseases such as gray leaf spot (GLS). The major difference between BLS and GLS is that the lesion margins of bacterial leaf streak are wavy whereas they are blunt in gray leaf spot. It’s important to tell the difference between the two since fungicides will not control bacterial diseases. On CropWatch at http://cropwatch.unl.edu, there is an article showing a number of corn diseases and how to identify them. Be sure to check it out and when in doubt, you can always get a sample to your local Extension educator or the plant and pest diagnostic lab.
Tamra Jackson-Ziems also has a Youth BLS Survey and competition with cash prizes for FFA.
Chapters, 4-H Clubs, or other youth groups that submit the most POSITIVE samples from different fields. Groups submitting 3 or more positive samples also get a certificate identifying them as “Certified Crop Disease Detectives!” Youth packets can be obtained from Tamra directly by emailing her at:  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.